The ANDERSON GLIDE, It could make the difference…






Many of you have heard of the Anderson Sling…  An equine lifesaver.

But most of you probably haven’t heard of the Anderson Glide.  And it is equally as essential…

Click to learn more about the Sling and the Glide

Click to learn more about the Sling and the Glide

What does the Anderson Glide do?

It slides a downed horse over the ground and into a vehicle.

Think about it… If your horse was down, how would you get him into a trailer?

Or, even worse, what if your horse was treatable, but only if he could be moved from the field…

THAT is the issue.

THAT deciding factor – whether the horse can be transported  – is what determines his fate.

I sure wouldn’t want to be faced with that decision.

If only…

If only we could have gotten him into the trailer, he could have been saved.

Enter the Anderson Glide.

This is the Anderson Glide being demonstrated with a model horse.

This is the Anderson Glide being demonstrated with a model horse.

THE ANDERSON GLIDE

The Anderson Glide is a rescue system including a surface that can be slid under the animal and then moved via many pulley methods.  The gurney is thick enough to protect the horse/animal yet negotiable over the ground.

With the Anderson Glide, rescuers can use their equipment (trucks, tractor, manpower…) to gently pull the downed horse into a trailer for dispatch.  Once at the rescue aid facility, the horse can be safely removed from the trailer and brought into surgery or wherever.

A godsend.

The Anderson Glide being used to rescue a horse (used by the same folks who just rescued the 41 Virginia Range Horses).

The Anderson Glide being used to rescue a real horse – facilitated by the same group who recently negotiated the rescue of the 41 Virginia Range Horses – this is their photo they took during this horse’s rescue.

REMEMBER THE DEVOTED CITIZENS WHO SAVED THE 41 VIRGINIA RANGE HORSES THIS MONTH?

Remember the group who recently went all out to save the 41 Virginia Range horses this month? Well… they do a lot of rescue work in Nevada through Least Resistance Training Concepts, a 501(c)(3) non-profit.

On weekends, they are allowed to borrow the Anderson Glide that the State owns.

That is how they were able to rescue the horse pictured above and the horse pictured below.

They saved this horse who was down in the water by transporting him on the Anderson Glide.

They saved this horse who was down in the water by transporting him on the Anderson Glide.  This is an actual photo taken buy the group during this rescue.

Obviously, this device takes knowledge and manpower to maneuver - but it can be the difference between life and not life.

Obviously, this device takes knowledge and manpower to maneuver – but it can be the difference between life and not life. (Another actual photo)

Another actual scene from a real rescue where they used the Anderson Glide to move the injured horses safely.

Another actual scene from a real rescue where they used the Anderson Glide to move the injured horses safely.

THE PROBLEM

Recently, LRTC was hit with a rescue situation that drove a point home…

They need a Glide ‘at the ready’  so they wouldn’t have to be weekend only helpers in these situations

Hmmmm.

I would not want to be the owner who is denied rescue because my horse got sick during the week.

Ugh.

THE CASE IN POINT…

Below is a true Story… very hard to read but this happened to the ER people from LRTC a few months ago….

This poor horse, Little George, was down – clearly a neglect case.  The group was called to rescue him.  Sadly, the call came during the week and there was no safe way to get this little guy onto the awaiting trailer.  The vet who was called to the scene recommended euthanasia.

Even though everyone tried, they couldn’t move George comfortably.  So, he was euthanized amid the frustration of his rescuers.

The ER Team was so upset because this boy was interested in what was going on around him.  As you can see by the photos, he was eating his hay.  They felt he should have been given the chance.

This poor guy may not have survived - but he may have - if they could have moved him safely.  He was eating and engaged...  This sad event happened a few months ago during his rescue.  The fact that they didn't have an Anderson Glide made the rescuers resolute to get one.

This poor guy may not have survived – but he may have – if they could have moved him safely. He was eating and engaged… This sad event happened a few months ago during his rescue. The fact that they didn’t have access to their borrowed Anderson Glide – which would have brought this young horse to a hospital – made the rescuers resolute to get one of their own.

Now, having a Glide doesn’t mean George would have positively survived. HOWEVER, the fact that they had to put him down on site because they couldn’t bring him into the hospital made the rescuers resolute to get a Glide of their own.

So, with the last few days of the Bucket Fund before us, can we help the rescuers that did so much work for the Virginia Range 41?  Can we help them with their goal of $1800 to  purchase an Anderson Glide?

They go out and tirelessly do whatever they can to help horses – all the time.  I’d like to help them in their endeavors because they absolutely make a difference.

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HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!



2 comments have been posted...

  1. Teri Ann

    I am a Certified Large Animal Rescue Tech II, here in AZ, and we have been trained using the Anderson Glide. It’s an awesome contraption and has been used several times.

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