EQUINE ILLUSTRATORS…






Sometimes, when I’m going through my horsey magazines, I dogear a page because I like the illustration.

Do you?

For example, in the January issue of HORSE AND RIDER, there was an article on “Early Warnings – Train your eye to spot seven subtle signs that your horse needs to see a vet.”

What made me stop and look at the article header was the illustration.

Sure, I skimmed the good words and nodded at the facts… but I really studied the illustration.  In fact, I looked at the byline to find the artist.  Her name is June Brigman.

I loved this illustration by June Brigman... it really drew me in.

I loved this illustration by June Brigman… it really drew me in.

For some reason, this drawing captured me.  I sat there and looked at the entire thing and laughed to myself at the notion of this horse “ooohing” over his 7 horsey tarot cards…

I thought the crystal ball showing his image inside was so funny.  I loved his hoof on the table and his opened lower lip.

So, on that note, I thought I’d share a few recent horse illustrations and see if you like them, too…

ILLUSTRATION

Illustrators have a tough job.  They must illustrate what is being said in many words, with just one picture.

It is drawing – succinctly.

They get paid well if they can summarize or accent an article with imagery that stimulates the readers’ visual grasp.

AMERICAN COWBOY MAGAZINE

I flipped through my recent AMERICAN COWBOY magazine looking for illustrators.

The one that caught my attention was this artist.  I say, “this artist” because I couldn’t (and I tried) find his/her name.  I hate when that happens.

Anyway, I liked his depiction of the “Young Bloods”.  Immediately I saw the computer on his lap and the phone to his ear – not your Dad’s Cowboy… dad being the guy behind the Young Blood, looking steely eyed with his coffee.

From AMERICAN COWBOY magazine... an illustration has to grab you and make you understand the article in a snapshot.  This piece does that for me.  New style cowboy compared to old style...

From AMERICAN COWBOY magazine… an illustration has to grab you and make you understand the article in a snapshot. This piece does that for me. New style cowboy compared to old style…

I also liked this illustration, by the same unknown artist.

To me, I just like the pudginess of all the characters.  Round always seems more engaging to my eye.

I’m guessing this artist is the regular illustrator for AMERICAN COWBOY since I recognize his work.  And I guess I should have been able to find his name.  But, I couldn’t.  So, if you know him, please introduce me…

Screen Shot 2013-01-29 at 8.57.27 PM

FERGUS

You all probably already know Fergus.

He is drawn by Jean Abernethy, illustrator.

Everytime Fergus has a FB entry on my FB page, I squeal!  I cannot wait to read what he has to say!  I totally love him.  Fergus is cut from the same cloth as my Finn – he always makes me smile.

The idea of a simple, one or two frame comic strip still engages me.  Especially if I can relate.

— It is a dream of mine to have my donkey, Norma Jean, have her own digital strip.  If I could figure out how to syndicate her daily FB blogs, I would.

So, to me, Jean Abernethy has the perfect job – her pet as her muse.  I love it!

Here is a link to his FB page, if you’d like to friend him.

Fergus.  Click image to go to his FB page...

Fergus. Click image to go to his FB page…

AN AD FOR PURINA STRATEGY

I don’t have any affiliation with Purina Strategy and I don’t happen to feed it to my horses – but, I really liked this ad.

This is a different kind of illustrator.  Whomever this is, works for an ad agency.  Of course, he/she doesn’t get to put his/her name under the ad artwork… sad but true.

So, whomever you are… know that I think this concept and your drawing drew me in like a bear to honey.

(I have to be honest, the first time I saw this ad, I thought it was made up of bugs.  I don’t know why… I had to look at it again to see what it actually was … but, I still liked it, even if it was bugs.)

Does anyone else like it?

I thought this illustration for Purina was clever.

THANKS FOR BRIEFLY SKIPPING THROUGH ARTISTRY WITH ME TODAY!

I went back through some old issues of HORSE AND RIDER and found a few more…

Here is another one by June Brigman for an article entitled, "On the Road Again (Safely!)

Here is another one by June Brigman for an article entitled, “On the Road Again (Safely!)

This one didn't photograph as nicely as it appears... you can't quite see the horse buried and quaking inside the hay bales... The article is called, "Needle Whoas" and the illustrator is Scott Peck.

This one didn’t photograph as nicely as it appears… you can’t quite see the horse buried and quaking inside the hay bales… The article is called, “Needle Whoas” and the illustrator is Scott Peck.

 

HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth… if you like this, please pass it around!

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Help LRTC buy an Anderson Glide to help their Emergency Rescuers!  Click image

Help LRTC buy an Anderson Glide to help their Emergency Rescuers! Click image

 

 

 

 

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HORSE AND MAN is a blog in growth... if you like this, please pass it around!



3 comments have been posted...

  1. Peg

    Yea!! You’re back!
    Love the illstrations.
    Have you ever noticed the covers on Historical Romances? Some of them are histerical,like the “cowboy” using an English bridle/quilted saddle blanket under a saddle that defies discription. Or another of a “cowboy” riding hellforleather on a horse with a racing bridle and a rag tied around the lower jaw. Thing is,the covers are very well done. The painter must be having a joke.

  2. Rachel G.

    I love the illustrations in Horse&Rider! I, too, studied that particular picture. And the Purina ad is like the macaroni/lentil/bean pictures made by children, but translated better in real life yearly to the Corn Palace in South Dakota.

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